Below are the weekly tracking charts in Howard County and Maryland I have been working on for some time now and some comments on the data this week. If interested in the data behind the charts I have this handy Google Sheet with the specifics of the data noted on the graphs in this article.

Here are the weekly tracking charts looking at the total number of reported cases in Maryland and Howard County:

Note – The numbers this week were pretty consistent with what we had seen from the previous week. A slight downtick at the state level and a slight uptick at the local level.

Here are the weekly tracking charts of the number of deaths in Maryland and in Howard County (I still believe that this should be a critical metric to watch closely going forward):

Note – I was a little bummed to see the number of deaths related to COVID-19 at the state level rise slightly this week. Here in Howard County we added no new deaths related to COVID-19 (the number last Saturday and this Saturday remained at 111).

Here is the weekly tracking chart of hospitalizations (“ever hospitalized”) in Maryland:

Note – The number of Hospitalizations “ever hospitalized” rose slightly this week but remained under 400 for the week.

Here is the weekly tracking numbers for new ICU and Acute Hospital Beds for COVID-19, Currently in Use:

Note – this tracking has been noted as critical for Maryland. Four consecutive weeks of lower numbers of beds in use at the state level. These numbers are approaching all time lows.

Howard County…after hitting seeing a spike up to 21 beds in use last week is back down to only 11 beds in use reported today.

Here is the weekly tracking of number of people tested weekly across the state (looking at positive cases and people testing negative):

Note – Testing (as I am tracking it by persons testing positive and persons testing negative) was below 90,000 in a week for the first time in a while. I can not put my finger on why this is the case today.

People testing positive was up a little but remained below the 5% number many are looking at with these numbers.

I will continue to track and report this data the best I can…and I hope you find the weekly data even more informative than the daily reported data from various entities (including me).

Here are important links with data on Coronavirus (COVID-19) numbers:

Here is a site to watch for information on Maryland cases: https://phpa.health.maryland.gov/Pages/Novel-coronavirus.aspx

Here is the site to keep an eye on in Howard County for updates: https://www.howardcountymd.gov/Departments/Health/MM-Alerts-and-Recalls

This is a good site to keep up to date with the latest coronavirus updates worldwide:  (Worldometer) https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/ or (Johns Hopkins) https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html.

I have a Google spreadsheet for tracking some of the daily Maryland and Howard County numbers and my weekly numbers:  https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1OVZO0oIaEC__KXZ9LwtnhawO1NhdqE78VJ9Hd5LCQ0k/edit?usp=sharing

Scott E

Note: Daily COVID-19 updates going forward will happen on Monday, Wednesday and Friday (unless something significant needs to be reported on the other days) during the week. Weekly weekend charts will continue to happen when there are significant items to review.

1 COMMENT

  1. I’m struggling to understand the significance of the “positivity” rate. Because the rate is so influenced by who is getting tested, it seems almost meaningless. When access to testing was restricted to those with suspicious symptoms, the rate would be expected to be higher; when testing became more available and people who were simply concerned that they might have been exposed could get tested, the positivity rate understandably declined. When colleges started opening and requiring all students to get tested before returning to campus, the rates declined again. When flu season starts, we’ll see a flood of negative tests due to people being tested as a result of flu symptoms.

    Because the “positivity rate” isn’t normalized to anything, it’s hard for me to understand why so much attention is being given to it. It’s even harder to understand why it is being considered as a metric for public health decisions like whether to open public schools.

    If someone can explain why this metric is a reasonable proxy for the rate of infection despite the wildly varying denominator, I’d like to hear it (please don’t explain what the metric is or that it is a metric…that won’t add to an intelligent discussion). Thanks!

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